Better Health, Better Hearing

You Can Delay Age-Related Hearing Loss

Physical Activity Delays the Onset of Age-Related Hearing Loss

Age-related hearing loss affects almost two-thirds of U.S. adults over the age of 70. It’s a result of natural changes that happen in your inner ear, middle ear, and neural pathways as you age. The loss is gradual and can lead to communication problems, feelings of isolation, and decreased physical function. But results from a recent study in the Journal of Neuroscience suggest that regular exercise can delay age-related hearing loss.

The Study The researchers compared two groups of mice for 24 months. The experimental group regularly exercised by running on a wheel; the control group did not.

Mice in the exercise group had better hearing after 24 months than did the control group, and the physical findings supported this: For mice in the exercise group, key areas of the inner ear hadn’t broken down as much as the same …

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Airplanes and Ear Pain

6 tips for a comfortable flight

Your Ears and Altitude

You’re cruising at 39,000 feet, seat reclined, in-flight movie rolling along, when the pilot announces, “Ladies and gentlemen, we’re beginning our descent. Please put your seats and tray tables in the upright position, and prepare for landing.”

Soon your ears are feeling full, you can’t hear, and the flight can’t end soon enough.

What’s going on? You’re experiencing the common effects of altitude-related air-pressure changes in the middle ear, which can cause clicking and popping, ear pain or blockage, general discomfort, and even temporary hearing loss.

The good news? A few simple steps can go a long way toward preventing or limiting the problem.

Normally the eustachian tube, a narrow passageway from the ear to the back of the nose, helps keep pressure in the ear relatively equal. When external pressure changes quickly, however — like in air travel — your body might need a …

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You’ll Be the Talk of the Picnic Table

These Delicious Side Dishes Are Good for Your Blood Sugar and Your Hearing

According to the National Institutes of Health, those with diabetes are twice as likely to have hearing loss. Because we’re deep into the grilling months, we’re offering a couple of delicious diabetes-friendly side-dish recipes for your next cookout that will tickle taste buds, turn heads, and take it easy on your blood sugar.

Stuffed Mushrooms

Ingredients (serves 12) Stuffing

6 oz Mexican chorizo sausage ½ cup onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 can (11 oz) whole-kernel corn, drained 2 oz low-fat cream cheese ¼ cup fat-free sour cream ½ tsp salt

  Remaining ingredients

2 slices whole-wheat bread 24 stuffer mushroom caps (or large, de-stemmed mushrooms)

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 400°. Cook de-cased chorizo, onion, and garlic in a skillet over medium heat for 6 minutes or until browned, stirring to crumble. Drain chorizo mixture and pat dry with paper towels. Combine chorizo mixture and corn …

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Hear Happy This Fourth

Dos and Don’ts for Taking Little Ones to See Fireworks

If you have a newborn in the family, here’s what you need to know about Little One’s ears and fireworks.

Every detail of your family’s Fourth has been planned to a “T,” from the neighborhood barbecue to staking out the perfect spot to watch fireworks. But there’s one more thing to do: Grab Baby’s hearing protection.

While the iconic booms and pops of fireworks come with a thrill, they also put hearing at risk — especially for little ones. From what’s too loud to where to sit and what to do, here’s what you need to know to help keep your family’s hearing healthy this Independence Day and those to come.

Most adults think that because it doesn’t bother their hearing, it won’t bother Baby’s. This isn’t necessarily true — babies hear differently than adults. Loud sounds could potentially damage infants’ hearing and hinder auditory development.

“Babies …

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Enjoy music the way the musician intended

How to Listen to Music With Hearing Aids

Traditional hearing aids are designed to help those with hearing loss better hear and understand the acoustic characteristics of speech — but not so much music. Here are some hearing tips, tricks, and accessories for enjoying music the way the musician intended.  

Speech Versus Song

The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Hearing Enhancement of Gallaudet University explains the difference between speech and music: “The acoustic characteristics of music are quite different from speech, and a hearing aid that works well for speech perception may not be appropriate when listening to music. For example, the range between the softest sounds of speech (the voiceless th) and the loudest (the vowel aw) is about 30 to 35 decibels, while even the loudest speech signal rarely exceeds 85 to 90.

“In music, the range between the softest and loudest sounds is in the order of 100 decibels, with the …

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