Graphic representing loud noise that requires hearing protection

Are You Protecting Your Hearing?

Fireworks and concerts might come to mind when pondering ear-busting sounds, but power tools and even some livestock can reach dangerous decibels, too. Let’s talk hearing protection, which can go a long way toward keeping harmful noise at bay.

Types of Hearing Protection

At home, work, or play, the world can be an exciting but noisy place, putting your hearing health at risk. How? Loud sounds — especially those in the danger zone of 85 decibels or higher — can lead to hearing loss, tinnitus, or both.

It’s helpful to avoid loud environments in the first place. That’s not always practical, however, especially if the job you love, favorite hobbies, and other important activities bring joy — and add some noise — to your everyday life.

Let’s talk about different types of hearing protection that can help keep you and your loved ones listening — and living — your best. …

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Illustration of a mom and dad holding their two children, with grandma and grandpa in the background - all with big smiles on their faces

Protect Your Family’s Hearing This July

If you live in Canada or the U.S., you’ll be celebrating in early July. But you’ll also be in preparation mode: Those burgers aren’t going to grill themselves, the chairs need to be set out early for this year’s parade, and the kids need their patriotic outfits. To help out, we’re going to make this easy yet essential to-do for you: Protect your family’s hearing this holiday.  

What You Need to Know About Fireworks and Your Hearing

The amount of damage that fireworks cause to your hearing depends on:

The distance you are from them The intensity of their explosion How old you are

The bangs and booms from fireworks can cause serious hearing damage, with sounds reaching 150 decibels (dB) at 3 feet.

For adults, the recommendation from the World Health Organization is not to be exposed to more than 140 decibels …

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Cute illustrated foxes doing yoga

5 Tips to Keep Your Better-Hearing Resolution Going Strong

From spending more time with family and friends to taking classes at the local gym, almost everyone makes at least one New Year’s resolution. The catch? Just 8% of resolvers stick to their goals, per a Forbes story referencing University of Scranton research.

No worries: If you’re aiming to hear your best in 2020, we’re sharing five tips to help boost your stick‑to‑itiveness for the new year and beyond!

BE REALISTIC WRITE IT DOWN VISUALIZE SUCCESS TELL A FRIEND SET BENCHMARKS

No matter your new-year goals, we’re committed to helping you reach them with the power of better hearing. So don’t delay. Contact our caring team for help that’s tailored to your communication needs today!      

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Illustration of hunter walking through the woods

The Hunt for Hearing Protection: What You Should Know to Keep Your Ears Safe

There’s nothing like National Protect Your Hearing Month in October to bring two important passions together — hearing health and hunting. If you love being in the great outdoors to get that perfect shot, we want to help you make it happen without hearing loss. Here’s what you need to know about safeguarding your ears while maintaining your A-game. 

What’s the Connection Between Hunting & Hearing Loss?

Noise levels at 85 decibels and higher can damage your hearing — permanently, in some cases. With the ability of even small-caliber firearms to reach well past that threshold to levels including 140 decibels, it’s no wonder that having your ears unprotected during shooting can lead to hearing loss.

According to a report at the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s (ASHA) website, other factors can further contribute to dangerous noise levels during firearm use. For example:

Discharging the gun where the sound …

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Hand Dryers: For Kids, Beware the Noise

Hand Dryers: For Kids, Beware the Noise

It’s no secret that hand dryers installed in public bathrooms can seem rather loud, but we were blown away by a young scientist’s findings when she put the volume levels of 44 automated machines to the test in restrooms across Alberta, Canada.

Turns out some of those volumes can do a number on kids’ ears — which are more susceptible to noise-induced hearing problems — by reaching sound levels well beyond the danger zone of 85 decibels. Several of the various brands measured above 100 decibels when in actual use for hand-drying, and one was even greater than 120.

The study, by then-9-year-old Nora Keegan, has captured international attention, with coverage by the New York Times, CNN, Canada’s CBC, and other media outlets. Now 13, Keegan is likely one of the youngest researchers to have her work published in the journal Pediatrics & Child Health. …

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