Illustration of a silhouette of a human head with a brain - represented by a rain cloud - inside

Could Healthy Hearing Help People With Movement Disorders?

Your ears and your brain are fast friends. In fact, it seems like a new connection is reported every few months. There’s even a growing body of research showing that untreated hearing loss is linked to dementia.

That’s why we encourage annual hearing checkups. Catching changes in hearing early keeps a host of other issues at bay. And we’re just scratching the surface of what we know about the ear-brain connection.

Your ears and brain are so well connected, in fact, that one recent study in Scientific Reports is based on a link the researchers discovered on accident. It’s a link that could improve the assistive devices used by people with movement disorders or limb loss. 

Brain-Computer Interfaces

A research team called BrainGate develops brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). These are implants that use nerve signals in the brain to manipulate assistive devices such …

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The Summer Reading/Watch/Listen List You Need

No summer’s complete without a good reading list, so we’re hooking you up.

From books to films to podcasts, we’ve put together some inspiring, entertaining, or though-provoking options that have some connection to hearing loss or sound. Take a listen, watch, or read, and let us know what you think!

The Way I Hear It: A Life With Hearing Loss (Book) Humorist, actress, public speaker, and hearing loss advocate Gael Hannan takes readers on a journey of life lessons and more in this 2015 book. Her insights offer advice and inspiration not only for those with hearing loss but for their loved ones, too. Sound of Metal* (Film) Imagine being a musician on tour when suddenly confronted with profound hearing loss. It’s the challenge of a lifetime for heavy-metal drummer Ruben, who’s also in recovery. The deep-diving movie …

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Illustration of several people in workers' coveralls holding a variety of common home maintenance tools like a screwdriver, wrench, and hammer

6 Ways to Keep Your Hearing Aids in Shape

Does hearing technology call for ongoing professional upkeep? Can I handle any needed maintenance at home? How can I tell whether my devices are damaged? Where can I take them for replacement or repair?

Much like today’s tablets and cellphones, hearing aids are powered by complex technology that may require professional attention in certain circumstances, but a little DIY maintenance can go a long way in keeping your devices in top shape.

Self-care of your hearing aids is an important part of keeping them performing their best, and periodic clean and checks with our caring professionals help identify and address any damage or other problems that might otherwise be harder to spot. Read on for six simple tips to maximize your tech’s longevity.

Keep ‘Em Dry and Sanitized Water is kryptonite to hearing aids, so remember to remove them before showering or swimming, and use a hearing aid dryer or …

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Illustration of different sized batteries standing in a line colored red, teal, and yellow

Should I Get Rechargeable Hearing Aids?

Rechargeable hearing aids are becoming more common. It’s natural to assume they’re the preferred model. But is that true? Check out our breakdown to see if rechargeable is the way to go. You might decide traditional disposable batteries fit your needs better.

Disposable vs. Rechargeable

Disposable

A disposable battery sits in a compartment in the hearing aid. You can easily access it via the battery door. When the hearing aid loses power, you switch out the battery for a fresh one.

Rechargeable

Rechargeable batteries are sealed inside the hearing aid. There’s no battery door, so you can’t access the battery. When the hearing aid loses power, you put the hearing aid on or in a charging station to recharge it.

Why Would You Prefer Disposable Hearing Aid Batteries?

More hearing aid styles

Disposable batteries are the norm for any hearing aid style. Rechargeables, however, are only available for behind-the-ear, receiver-in-canal, …

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Illustration of men and women standing together, one in a wheelchair, using electronic devices

Tech Inclusivity Is Growing, and We Love It

Every year, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) creates quite a stir with innovative new products and a window into potential trends. This year, the trade show — all digital for the first time in its 54-year history — leaned even more into inclusive tech, which helps everyone participate more in life.

Why does it matter? It’s all about accessibility, which is a big part of why we’re in the hearing care business. Better hearing helps people access more of what matters in their lives. For example, it:

Helps keep connections to loved ones strong Reduces the risk of social withdrawal or isolation Goes hand in hand with better physical and mental health Supports workplace success and earning power Plays a role in staying safe and alert

Some of the inclusive tech at CES 2021:

Smartphone apps such as HeardThat, which reportedly works …

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